‘Festivalling’: Are jazz festivals utopian? – Emma Webster

I have just returned from the Rhythm Changes ‘Jazz Utopia’ conference in Birmingham (14-17 April 2016). The majority of the one hundred plus speakers really engaged with the theme of the conference and grappled with jazz’s potential for exploring and achieving utopia from a wide variety of perspectives: historical, musicological, sociological and interdisciplinary.

My paper gave a brief overview of a literature review currently in review with the Jazz Research Journal about the impact of jazz festivals; based on the final part of my paper, this blog post will consider briefly the ways in which jazz festivals have been or could be considered to be utopian. Continue reading ‘Festivalling’: Are jazz festivals utopian? – Emma Webster

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FREE EVENT: Researching (Jazz) Festivals: A Day of Ideas and Discussion – Cheltenham Jazz Festival – Friday 29 April 2016

Researching (Jazz) Festivals: A Day of Ideas and Discussion
Cheltenham Jazz Festival
Friday 29 April 2016, 10-5pm

FREE attendance (must register via Cheltenham Jazz Festival box office)

The Impact of Festivals is a 12-month project funded under the Arts and Humanities Research Council’s Connected Communities Programme, working with research partner organization, the EFG London Jazz Festival. The Principal Investigator is Professor George McKay, AHRC Leadership Fellow for the Connected Communities Programme, and Professor of Media Studies at the University of East Anglia. The Research Associate is Dr Emma Webster, co-founder and Director of Live Music Exchange. Continue reading FREE EVENT: Researching (Jazz) Festivals: A Day of Ideas and Discussion – Cheltenham Jazz Festival – Friday 29 April 2016

The impact of jazz festivals – top three articles (so far) – Emma Webster

Radcliffe Camera, Bodleian Library, University of Oford
Radcliffe Camera, Bodleian Library, University of Oxford © Sabrina Chap 2013

One of the pleasures of this project has been that it has enabled me to read (and sometimes re-read) literature about festivals – and spending a day in the Radcliffe Camera at the Bodleian Library in Oxford whilst doing so is not such a shabby way to spend a day.

The following is my Buzzfeed style list about my favourite three articles (so far) about jazz festivals, which I highly recommend for anyone interested in jazz, festivals, or jazz festivals! Continue reading The impact of jazz festivals – top three articles (so far) – Emma Webster

Festivals as sites for discovering (and sharing) new music – Emma Webster

For Christmas this year, I was given some new CDs. So what, you may ask? The difference this year is that it’s usually my husband asking for new CDs while I stick to what’s already on my iPod (not that surprising considering that musical listening habits change throughout adulthood). This year, however, I had asked for CDs from artists I’d heard at the EFG London Jazz Festival 2015 and have been listening to them on repeat ever since. Today’s blog, then, is about festivals as sites for sharing and sharing new music with family and friends, both on- and off-site. Continue reading Festivals as sites for discovering (and sharing) new music – Emma Webster

The Impact of Festivals project – thoughts on the form and function of our report for the AHRC – Emma Webster

The Impact of Festivals project will generate two outputs: a report for the AHRC on the impact of festivals, based on a literature review and interviews with audience members and festival directors, and a critical history of the London Jazz Festival, which will be published as a book in 2017 as part of the Festival’s 25th anniversary.

Since the end of the London Jazz Festival back in November, I have been working on the literature review, which has thrown up a number of interesting questions and challenges. Continue reading The Impact of Festivals project – thoughts on the form and function of our report for the AHRC – Emma Webster

Timeline of festival culture 1950-present

The history of festivals in Britain (and beyond) is rich in history – from the Festival of Britain in 1951 to the riot of Beaulieu Jazz Festival in 1960, and the epochal Woodstock Festival in 1969 through to Jay-Z headlining Glastonbury Festival in 2008, festival culture now appears firmly embedded in mainstream culture.

The timeline presented here comes from a variety of sources, the genesis being Professor George McKay’s 2000 book Glastonbury: A Very English Fair, in which, as George says, ‘There is a certain randomness to this [timeline], both in terms of where it starts and what it includes, and a certain bias in its focus around popular music and left politics, either traditionally organised or lifestyle. Why not add your own entries, too?’

The history of festivals is still very much being written – do get in touch if you feel that we have missed out a festival of significance so that the history of festivals continues to grow.

Click here for festival timeline.

The Streets – unexpected musical happenings on Leyton High Street – Emma Webster

The Streets is a project devised by EFG London Jazz Festival (LJF) producer, Serious, to ‘showcase the local streetscape and unlock the potential of high streets’ with the aims of spectacle, discovery, and participation. The first phase of the project started in July 2015 and consisted of a series of events across seven boroughs (Waltham Forest, Redbridge, Greenwich, Croydon, Wandsworth, Richmond upon Thames and Kingston upon Thames). As Serious co-Director Claire Whitaker said to a group of students about the event: ‘The sun came out, people spent money in shops; the project was a success’. The second phase coincided with the LJF in November 2015, a deliberate ploy which allowed the organisers to take advantage of the increased number of touring musicians in the city and increased opportunities for the musicians to earn money and build an audience. Continue reading The Streets – unexpected musical happenings on Leyton High Street – Emma Webster