The changing aesthetic of the London Jazz Festival brochure

LJF_1993_front_coverThe London Jazz Festival began in 1993, the guide to the new event a pull-out section of the magazine Jazz and a free supplement to The Observer rather than a brochure per se.  London in the 1990s was a city only just starting to come out of a fifty year post-war population decline, but by 2014, as a result of the highly successful Olympic Games in 2012 and its pre-eminence on the global financial stage,  Forbes magazine had designated London the ‘most influential city in the world’.  As the Festival has changed over the years, so too has the look and feel of the brochure, and it is also interesting to note that the way in which the Festival has used London imagery over the years, sometimes placing the city front and centre and other times focusing on jazz. Continue reading The changing aesthetic of the London Jazz Festival brochure

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What people are saying about our report on the impact of festivals, ‘From Glyndebourne to Glastonbury’

Our new report about the impact of British music festivals has already garnered some great feedback – here is what some people have said about it:

EFG London Jazz Festival logo“Within festivals we need and value the criticality of academic research. A report like this helps us shape, make sense of, and rethink what we are doing.”
John Cumming OBE, Director, EFG London Jazz Festival

Continue reading What people are saying about our report on the impact of festivals, ‘From Glyndebourne to Glastonbury’

From Glyndebourne to Glastonbury: The Impact of British Music Festivals – Emma Webster and George McKay

A new report, written by Emma Webster and George McKay and published online last week, highlights the impact of British music festivals and shows that festivals are now at the heart of the British music industry, forming an essential part of the worlds of rock, classical, folk and jazz. Funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council’s (AHRC) Connected Communities programme, the report is based on a critical literature review of more than 170 books, papers and reports.

The sheer breadth of perspectives about festivals was surprising: from the economic impact of the Edinburgh Festivals to the experience of performers and audiences Gilbert and Sullivan Festival to the impact of a chamber music festival on a bat colony, the literature on festivals highlights the way that they have captured the imaginations of researchers across the world.

The following offers a brief summary of the report – to read the full report and the accompanying annotated bibliography, click here.

Continue reading From Glyndebourne to Glastonbury: The Impact of British Music Festivals – Emma Webster and George McKay

Report published online today: From Glyndebourne to Glastonbury: The Impact of British Music Festivals – Emma Webster and George McKay

Our new report, published online today, highlights the economic, social and cultural impact of British music festivals, and shows that festivals are now at the heart of the British music industry, forming an essential part of the worlds of rock, classical, folk and jazz. Funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council’s (AHRC) Connected Communities programme, the report is based on a critical literature review of more than 170 books, papers and reports. Continue reading Report published online today: From Glyndebourne to Glastonbury: The Impact of British Music Festivals – Emma Webster and George McKay

Researching (jazz) festivals – 10 things learned from a day of discussion and ideas at the Cheltenham Jazz Festival – Emma Webster

To celebrate the launch of our new report on the impact of British music festivals, we held a day of ideas and discussion around jazz, festivals, and jazz festivals at the Cheltenham Jazz Festival on 29th April 2016. The following are ten things learned from the event, which brought together leading jazz and festival researchers, and festival directors, from around Britain and Europe. Continue reading Researching (jazz) festivals – 10 things learned from a day of discussion and ideas at the Cheltenham Jazz Festival – Emma Webster

‘Festivalling’: Are jazz festivals utopian? – Emma Webster

I have just returned from the Rhythm Changes ‘Jazz Utopia’ conference in Birmingham (14-17 April 2016). The majority of the one hundred plus speakers really engaged with the theme of the conference and grappled with jazz’s potential for exploring and achieving utopia from a wide variety of perspectives: historical, musicological, sociological and interdisciplinary.

My paper gave a brief overview of a literature review currently in review with the Jazz Research Journal about the impact of jazz festivals; based on the final part of my paper, this blog post will consider briefly the ways in which jazz festivals have been or could be considered to be utopian. Continue reading ‘Festivalling’: Are jazz festivals utopian? – Emma Webster

FREE EVENT: Researching (Jazz) Festivals: A Day of Ideas and Discussion – Cheltenham Jazz Festival – Friday 29 April 2016

Researching (Jazz) Festivals: A Day of Ideas and Discussion
Cheltenham Jazz Festival
Friday 29 April 2016, 10-5pm

FREE attendance (must register via Cheltenham Jazz Festival box office)

The Impact of Festivals is a 12-month project funded under the Arts and Humanities Research Council’s Connected Communities Programme, working with research partner organization, the EFG London Jazz Festival. The Principal Investigator is Professor George McKay, AHRC Leadership Fellow for the Connected Communities Programme, and Professor of Media Studies at the University of East Anglia. The Research Associate is Dr Emma Webster, co-founder and Director of Live Music Exchange. Continue reading FREE EVENT: Researching (Jazz) Festivals: A Day of Ideas and Discussion – Cheltenham Jazz Festival – Friday 29 April 2016